The Physical Culture & Iron Game Picture Thread

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Re: The Physical Culture & Iron Game Picture Thread

Post by peter yates » Tue Mar 28, 2017 10:10 am

For sure,more is not always better.
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DannyBoy
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Re: The Physical Culture & Iron Game Picture Thread

Post by DannyBoy » Wed Mar 29, 2017 1:45 pm

sticksb wrote:
DannyBoy wrote:Yeah, I think Robert Duranton was a prime example of the classic Apollonian physique.
Agree with that .
Perfect proportions and classic statue poses . Years ago I took a friend of mine to a bodybuilding show (regional).
She was an art major at Syracuse University . " What do you think ?" I asked her ." For the most part they look like
a bunch of body parts stuck together. No grace . No flow . Despite the bulging muscles there seemed no athletic
grace to most of the physiques displayed ". I think if Duranton or Clancy Ross were on that stage it might have
changed her mind . The Europeans through the 80s found that happy balance along with the Zanes and Baldwins
of the bodybuilding world.
I think that's a good way to put it. The grace, the flow, the artistry & creativity of posing all seems to have much faded away in recent years. Well I should point out that I don't assume to know what's going on across all the bodybuilding organizations and their contests around the world, there's obviously so many. So I'll just stick to the top organization, the IFBB of course. Now whether or not one likes the physiques of top bodybuilders today is really subjective and a matter of personal taste/opinion, but I don't think there's any question about it that the posing of today's top bodybuilders just isn't up to par with posing of the top bodybuilder of the golden age. The grace & flow is lacking and there's not too much artistry or creativity to the posing anymore, a notable exception being Kai Greene. I think Kai's a very good poser when he wants to be and he's certainly creative & unique. Most of the posing by the top IFBB pros today just seems monotonous though, at least from what I've seen, all due respect to them.

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Re: The Physical Culture & Iron Game Picture Thread

Post by sticksb » Wed Mar 29, 2017 2:32 pm

The whole shtick is monotonous .It's unfortunate that "bodybuilders" are lumped together
across the eras in many people's minds . Today's elite BB is temporary in almost every respect :
condition , size , strength and popularity . How many will impact physical culture history the
way Sandow ,Grimek or Reeves did ? Zilch. It's plug and play today . Get a base , take drugs
remanufacture yourself , spray on your tan , win a few , hit a wall and realize the futility
and financial reality of what you're doing . You also could train for the simple joy of being
strong and healthy and occasionally admired ...

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Re: The Physical Culture & Iron Game Picture Thread

Post by DannyBoy » Thu Mar 30, 2017 3:18 pm

sticksb wrote:The whole shtick is monotonous .It's unfortunate that "bodybuilders" are lumped together
across the eras in many people's minds . Today's elite BB is temporary in almost every respect :
condition , size , strength and popularity . How many will impact physical culture history the
way Sandow ,Grimek or Reeves did ? Zilch. It's plug and play today . Get a base , take drugs
remanufacture yourself , spray on your tan , win a few , hit a wall and realize the futility
and financial reality of what you're doing . You also could train for the simple joy of being
strong and healthy and occasionally admired ...
Excellent point and well put, Sticks!

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Re: The Physical Culture & Iron Game Picture Thread

Post by DannyBoy » Fri Apr 28, 2017 6:00 am

HOPC Facebook post:

Hungarian-born American competitive swimmer Johnny Weissmuller (June 2, 1904 - January 20, 1984) was the greatest swimmer of his era, becoming the first to break the one minute barrier for 100-meter freestyle and the first to swim 440-yard freestyle in under five minutes, and he was purportedly undefeated in official competition for the entirety of his competitive swimming career. He set 50 world records, won 52 US-national titles and 5 Olympic gold medals (3 in Paris in 1924 and 2 in Amsterdam in 1928) as well as a bronze medal as part of the men's water polo team in 1924. After his swimming career Weissmuller entered the film industry and gained even greater fame portraying Tarzan in 12 films from 1932 to 1948, and to this day remains the most famous of the screen Tarzans.

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Re: The Physical Culture & Iron Game Picture Thread

Post by DannyBoy » Sun May 07, 2017 5:05 am

HOPC Facebook post:

Edward "Ed" Hennig (October 13, 1879 - August 28, 1960) was an American gymnast who had a competitive career that lasted nearly 50 years, he won gold medals in Men's Club Swinging and Men's Horizontal Bar (where he tied for the gold with countryman Anton Heida) at the 1904 Olympic Games in St. Louis, Missouri, USA. The club swinging event at the 1904 Olympics also counted as the national championship and Hennig went on to win the AAU National Championship in club swinging another 12 times; 1911, 1933, 1936-37, 1939-40, 1942, 1945-47, and 1950-51. Hennig was 71 years old when he won his final national championship in 1951.

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Re: The Physical Culture & Iron Game Picture Thread

Post by peter yates » Sun May 07, 2017 11:20 am

DannyBoy wrote:HOPC Facebook post:

Hungarian-born American competitive swimmer Johnny Weissmuller (June 2, 1904 - January 20, 1984) was the greatest swimmer of his era, becoming the first to break the one minute barrier for 100-meter freestyle and the first to swim 440-yard freestyle in under five minutes, and he was purportedly undefeated in official competition for the entirety of his competitive swimming career. He set 50 world records, won 52 US-national titles and 5 Olympic gold medals (3 in Paris in 1924 and 2 in Amsterdam in 1928) as well as a bronze medal as part of the men's water polo team in 1924. After his swimming career Weissmuller entered the film industry and gained even greater fame portraying Tarzan in 12 films from 1932 to 1948, and to this day remains the most famous of the screen Tarzans.

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Thanks Danny, I must say whenever i think of Tarzan Weismuller immediately comes to mind.
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Re: The Physical Culture & Iron Game Picture Thread

Post by peter yates » Sun May 07, 2017 11:26 am

DannyBoy wrote:HOPC Facebook post:

Edward "Ed" Hennig (October 13, 1879 - August 28, 1960) was an American gymnast who had a competitive career that lasted nearly 50 years, he won gold medals in Men's Club Swinging and Men's Horizontal Bar (where he tied for the gold with countryman Anton Heida) at the 1904 Olympic Games in St. Louis, Missouri, USA. The club swinging event at the 1904 Olympics also counted as the national championship and Hennig went on to win the AAU National Championship in club swinging another 12 times; 1911, 1933, 1936-37, 1939-40, 1942, 1945-47, and 1950-51. Hennig was 71 years old when he won his final national championship in 1951.

Image
Anyone on the forum use Indian clubs? I first used them as a novice boxer and after a few bumps and lumps soon got the hang of them.Then they went out of fashion for a long time being resurrected sometime in the 1990s mainly by martial artists. I started using them again after shoulder injury and they did play a part in my rehab and since then keeping my shoulders healthy.
Regards,Peter.
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Re: The Physical Culture & Iron Game Picture Thread

Post by DannyBoy » Mon May 08, 2017 4:32 pm

peter yates wrote:Anyone on the forum use Indian clubs? I first used them as a novice boxer and after a few bumps and lumps soon got the hang of them.Then they went out of fashion for a long time being resurrected sometime in the 1990s mainly by martial artists. I started using them again after shoulder injury and they did play a part in my rehab and since then keeping my shoulders healthy.
Regards,Peter.
I've never used Indian clubs myself, but it's something I've grown some interest in recently and have looked into a bit. Actually, I'm less interested in Indian clubs and more interested in meels/Persian clubs. Have you ever trained with meels/Persian clubs before Peter?

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Re: The Physical Culture & Iron Game Picture Thread

Post by peter yates » Mon May 08, 2017 4:52 pm

No Danny, i have never used the heavy clubs.The heaviest i have are 3lb and believe me they are a workout in themselves.However my purpose in using the clubs is shoulder health maintainance not building strength. I would encourage anyone interested in the heavy work to first develop some skill with the lighter clubs.
Regards,Peter.
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