A few of the selected Competitors who were invited to London to compete in the Finals in the 100 Beauty Prize Contest. Another group published in the “Woman’s Beauty and Health.”)

Our £100 Prize Beauty Competition

£I000 would be a limited Estimate of the Additional Values that will come to the Winner of this Prize.

Supplement Macfadden Physical Development, Nov. 1912.

With this issue of our publication, we will begin a search for the most beautiful women throughout all Great Britain. We realize that there is a great difference in the various opinions as to what constitutes beauty. Some men, for instance, will rave about certain types of beauty, which would not even please other men. Real beauty, however, should not be superficial; it should be more than “skin deep” it should literally extend to every part of the body.
Red lips, bright eyes, and a complexion that is delicately coloured, when associated with regular features, are naturally considered the most important characteristics associated with beauty. In the distant past delicately moulded features, almost bordering on a clear indication of a frail physique, were much admired. The Physical Culture Movement, however, has stamped its influence upon this age, and vigorous types of womanhood are securing their full share of admiration.

Health must, after all, be the foundation of real beauty. Beauty that is evanescent, that passes away absolutely after the first flush of youth, is of but little real value. Beauty of the right sort is lasting. It does not disappear at twenty-five or thirty. . In fact, beauty of this kind does not really mature, does not unfold its greatest and most alluring charm until thirty or thirty-five. And many superior types of womanhood of this character maintain their attraction, their beauty of face and figure on to forty, and in some extreme cases even beyond fifty.

Miss Mary Williamson of Halifax, the
winner of the £100 Beauty Prize.

Now it is beauty of this type that should be exalted, for it definitely indicates the possession of a superbly strong body. It means that the beauty of figure, and of features, for that matter, is formed largely by the underlying healthy muscular tissue. To be sure there must be the overlying fat to give rounded outlines, but you must remember that under this tissue there must he a foundation of muscle. And this refers just as emphatically to the features as to the body itself, for the face is a veritable network of muscular tissue. For instance, every change of expression is brought about simply by the movements of the facial muscles. Therefore, in judging the various contestants in this competition, the woman will be considered as a whole. The face will be looked upon naturally as an important part of bodily beauty, but it will not by any means be the sole means of judging feminine perfection

This competition is open to every woman in Great Britain. There will be no age restrictions, though a girl who is not fully matured will have but little chance of winning. In addition to the cash prize offered, the winner will also have all her expenses paid on a tour throughout Great Britain, and the general public will have an opportunity to see her in the various prominent theatres and music halls.

Contestants should remember that the cash prize itself will represent but a small part of the compensations that will come to the successful competitor. After having been declared the most beautiful woman in Great Britain, and after having made the tour described, theatrical and other engagements can undoubtedly be secured with very liberal remuneration.

Remember that when you speak of a beautiful woman, you do not mean that she merely possesses features that are classically perfect in appearance; you mean that in addition to beauty of face she possesses animation, magnetism, that she radiates abounding, pulsating health, and that the symmetrical outlines of her figure, are all that can be desired. You will, therefore, see that in order to conduct this contest, measurements of the entire body must be secured; also the weight and the height.

Photographs must accompany all entries, though full-length photographs are not necessary. Contestants can send whatever photograph they may have which clearly shows their features. Where photographs of the entire figure are sent, they will no doubt assist the judges in coming to a just decision, but photographs of this nature are not required from contestants.

ENTRY BLANK

Great Britain’s £100 Beauty Contest.
To MACFADDEN’S PHYSICAL DEVELOPMENT, GENERAL BUILDINGS, ALDWYCH, LONDON, W.C.

I desire to enter as a contestant in the above Competition. I am enclosing herewith a photograph, which you can publish if you desire. I agree to make the tour of Great Britain with the Bernarr Macfadden Lecture Tour Company, if I am the winner of this prize, and will expect no additional compensation beside the prize money, though it is understood that all my railroad and hotel expenses should he paid.
My name is…………………………………………………………..
Address………………………………………………………………..
Age……… Weight……… Height………
Measurements to be filled in the squares as shown in the illustration below. Measurements should be taken without clothing. The tape should be pulled snugly round each portion of the body, but should never be drawn so tightly as to indent the flesh.

I will subscribe to your Magazine for one year. State whether you prefer to have the Magazine mailed to you direct from the home office, yearly subscription price 4/6, or whether you wish to secure it from your news dealer. If from news dealer, paying for it monthly as received, give name and address below.

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